Responsible sourcing for mining & metals – ICMM

Companies have a shared responsibility for the materials that they produce. Demonstrating value focuses on the two complementary sides of the responsible sourcing debate – sustainable procurement and responsible supply.

A client (a small to medium sized operation) recently asked my help to certify the origin of its production in a neighbouring country of DRC. If it’s diamonds we talking about, there are already standard procedures in place (it’s relatively easy); if it’s one of the 3TG (tin,tantalum, tungsten or gold), then it’s a complex maze, especially if you are outside the Great Lakes countries but in their shadow (neighbouring countries).

In this situation, there is no one locally to whom you may ask for advice (no financing for institutions to have representations in the countries outside the main focus of attention; yet local producers have to “exercise supply chain due diligence“, whatever this is (don’t bother explaining the concept, I understand it in theory; how does a small to medium operation puts it into practice?).

I use ICMM (as well as CIM and PDAC’s) guidelines and publications in the projects I design; I did it in the past and am doing it now in an exploration project in Angola. I must confess that I only check for new ICMM updates on a need to use basis; this time I downloaded the new report on responsible sourcing from today’s e-mail. Perhaps I will get (and my client) some insight from this document.

You may obtain it here or directly from ICMM website.

The social and economic impacts of gold mining

World Gold Council logoWorld Gold Council just published a new report on the social and economic impacts of gold mining. The report examines the wider footprint of gold mining and its implications for growth and development. To obtain the full report, just click: the-social-and-economic-impacts-of-gold-mining. You may also visit World Gold Council.

Key findings

  • Total contribution of over US$171bn to the global economy.
  • Total number of jobs that result from commercial gold mining rises to around 4.2 million globally.
  • In most gold producing countries, over 90% of the industry’s employees are local workers.
  • Over 60% of the countries covered in the report are low or lower-middle income with substantial socio-economic development needs.
  • 70% of the value that gold mining companies distribute within an economy relates to payments to local suppliers and employees.
  • Gold mining’s direct economic contribution to the global economy has increased seven-fold from 2000 to 2013.

World Gold Council infographic_1

De Beers’ DIAMOND INSIGHT REPORT 2014

Released a few days ago, you may obtain the latest perspective of De Beers’ on the diamond industry: de-beers-insight-report-2014. As usual, a well written, graphically appealing, must-read report containing De Beers’ published views and expectations about the diamond industry.