A first (rough) look into 2017 diamond production

World diamond production

After almost a decade of production stagnation around 130 Mct, Kimberley Process 2017 diamond annual production data show a marked production jump for diamonds. Production of rough diamonds rose from 134 Mct and US$12,4 bn (2016) to 151 Mct and US$15,9 bn (2017), an apparent return to pre-2008 levels (not there yet, but getting closer) – data from the Kimberley Process (KP).

South African production explains most of the jump in value recorded in KP data. It more than doubles previous year’s South African production value and it is a record value. Most probably I am missing something: can this be, or is the published data wrong? again, drop me a line to comment on this.

The sharp (12,5%) increase in rough diamond volume production is due to:

  • +  3,1 Mct in Australia;
  • +  2,5 Mct in Botswana;
  • + 10,2 Mct in Canada;
  • –   4,3 Mct in DRC;
  • +  0,8 Mct in Lesotho;
  • +  2,3 Mct in Russia and
  • +  1,4 Mct in South Africa.

The even sharper (28%!) value increase was due to:

  • +   483 M USD in Botswana;
  • +   663 M USD in Canada;
  • –     89 M USD in DRC;
  • +   533 M USD in Russia and
  • + 1 840 M USD in South Africa.

World diamond value

 

Oil and metals: Goliath and David

Another excellent infographic published by Visual Capitalist (a few weeks ago).
They left diamonds out of the picture, a pity. They included graphite, diamond’s darker and duller brother, though; curiously enough, both markets are very similar in value (diamond production marginally smaller, at close to $14B).
Courtesy of: Visual Capitalist

Mineral commodities 2013 total mined volumes and values, average prices

Commodities 2013

Diamonds mined in 2013 total 14 bn USD. How do they compare with other mineral commodities?

Rather than using somebody else’s compilations, I prefer to check values published by (commodity) specialised international organisations or public companies (OPEC, World Gold Council, KPCS, USGS, etc.). After some work, I have arrived to the estimates presented in the table to the left.

Is the ranking surprising? Any obvious error on the table’s values? Comments and suggestions (always) welcome. Yes, reality changed a lot since 2013 (only 18 months ago).